Teen rehab client agrees Inspirations is the best drug rehab on the east coast

July 11, 2016

As more and more teens are using heroin and in many cases overdosing and dying, it is welcome news to hear a happy ending involving the deadly opiate. One teen at Inspirations overcame her severe heroin addiction.

When you first see Marilyn, she looks like any other normal teen girl. Before coming to Inspirations she was able to hide from her family her heroin addiction and was slowly falling deeper into it. For about three to four months Marilyn was constantly abusing heroin. From snorting to shooting up she began to use heroin faster and more aggressively.

Even after suffering a near fatal overdose her mother began searching for a treatment center that could meet all of Marilyn's needs. Despite her near death experience Marilyn admits that she was still willing to use.

A near death experience

"I started using again. It was about a week after I overdosed. Like I didn’t think anything of it, I almost died and I didn’t even really care" said Marilyn.

After her research Marilyn's mother finally decided to admit her to Inspirations for Youth and Families. Although she was nervous Marilyn accepted that she needed help and came willingly into treatment. We asked Marilyn what made this possible and she says its due to her mom's trust and research on our treatment center.

My mom said "It was the best on the east coast."

Now that she has been here receiving treatment we also asked Marilyn if Inspirations lived up to hers and her mother's expectation.

"I agree. I think this place is great. I love the stuff we do here the meetings, the activities, everything. "

- Marilyn

Marilyn is referring to Inspirations extensive recreational therapy program where the teens go to great place like the beach, ice-skating events, and even paintball.

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Inspirations teen rehab taught me compassion

June 29, 2016

"I would isolate from everyone. I wouldn’t talk to anybody I had a lot of anger and just negative energy inside me." 

-Derek, Inspirations for Youth and Families client.

Inspirations for Youth and Families teen rehab has helped many teens return to the people they were before drug abuse or addiction. We also have a history of helping teens understand who they are to improve on their existing skills. In the case of Derek we helped him realize it's okay to be who you are and comfortable within your own skin. Our teen rehab has helped him gain a better perspective on his life as well as how it affects others.

"I’m way more compassionate than I thought. I actually like people, I like animals a lot more than I realized. Before when I was using I was a really hateful person." 

-Derek B.

This journey of self discovery was the key to Derek's success as this was his second time receiving treatment. Inspirations worked closely with him providing alternative forms of therapy which proved to really boost his self-confidence. His involvement in music therapy really shined through as it came became one of his favorite coping skills.

Derek suffered at the hands of bullying and began using to cope with his unresolved emotions. Both his individual and group therapy helped him to understand that he is his own person and there is nothing wrong with who he is.

"I had underlying self esteem issues. Back in middle school I was bullied a lot by other people on how I look and everything. I kind of turned into to this person that would like stay away from people or snap at people before they could snap at me. "

We've helped him turned this snap-ish attitude into one of positivity and compassion.

"I learned to let all that stuff go and just become a more passionate person that actually likes being around other people." 

-Derek on ways he has changed.

We are so proud of Derek's success and how much he has learned. Since coming here he has really come into his own. He's known for being very helpful and caring among the clients as well as staff. He's an inspiration and we really advocate his message on recovery.

"Recovery is not something that happens to you. You have to be the one to do it."

-Derek B.

Listen to what else Derek had to say about his stay here:

Denise: Hello! Thank you so much for wanting to give a testimonial before you leave. This is a happy day for you right?

Derek: Definitely!

Denise: How many days have you been here?

Derek: Uh I really wasn’t counting them but I think it was somewhere around 66 or 67.

Denise: Wow! Okay you say you weren’t really counting them which really is not normal because most people count the days and the seconds. So what made you decided not to count days?

Derek: I had been in a program before and I counted those days to the “T” and they made it seem like forever. So basically the first day I got here I just forgot about it you know. I forgot about what this place was. I forgot that this place was a rehab and I have to do this or that I have to do all these things. I kind of just forgot about it and kind of accepted it.

Denise: You went with the flow of it?

Derek: Yeah.

Denise: So you were at treatment before? What brought you to treatment the first time?

Derek: The first time was last summer. I was using a lot with my friends and I ended up throwing a party at my house. My parents were mad.

Denise: The classic (laughs).

Derek: Yeah (laughs). So then they were like we’re going to send him to rehab. Then that didn’t work.

Denise: What were using though?

Derek: Marijuana, Alcohol and Acid.

Denise: Oh okay.

Derek: So after they learned about all that they decided to send me to rehab. It was Oasis Adolescent Campus in Kissimee.

Denise: How was that?

Derek: it wasn’t awful but it wasn’t the best. It was a lot more strict than it is here. It was like gated and we were either in the living part or it or we were outside doing groups.

Denise: It was more of a lockdown?

Derek: Yeah definitely.

Denise: How long were you there?

Derek: I think somewhere around 30 days.

Denise: Oh, not enough days.

Derek: Yeah.

Denise: People love to tell their parents 30 days and we can say that to get them into treatment but you’ve been to treatment twice what would you day about the thirty days?

Derek: The thirty day mark you’re just hitting the tip of the iceberg. I haven’t even started; I’m still a child of recovery.

Denise: Yeah you exercise it when you leave here. Here you’re getting the tools, keeping you safe and away from drugs. You’re learning new things about yourself, experiencing activities maybe you haven’t before. But it’s not until you get into the real world that you are able to see if you’re committed.

Derek: Definitely.

Denise: Is there anything new you learned about yourself?

Derek: I learned that I’m way more compassionate than I thought. I actually like people, I like animals a lot more than I realized. Before when I was using I was a really hateful person.

Denise: Ah, did you isolate?

Derek: Yeah, I would isolate from everyone. I wouldn’t talk to anybody I had a lot of anger and just negative energy inside me. I learned to let all that stuff go and just become a more passionate person that actually likes being around other people. I love animals. I didn’t know that I love animals as much as I did.

Denise: How did you discover that?

Derek: I don’t really know I think it was…

Denise: The dog that comes here weekly?

Derek: Yeah! Luke the dog!

Denise: So maybe you should do something with animals.

Derek:  Yeah I’m going to.

Denise: Maybe you can volunteer at the Humane Society.

Derek: Yeah I want to do that and I’m going to apply for jobs at Petsmart.

Denise: Another awesome thing to do is a dog training course. Like learn to train dogs. It’s excellent and a great way to make extra money. Especially while you’re going to school. You can even do dog walking!

Derek: Mhm

Denise: There are a lot of people who make a good amount of money from walking dogs. They’ll do like three or four dogs in their neighborhood daily. Actually you can do quite well with that.

Derek: I think there’s a website called Pets.com or something where you can find like pet sitters and dog walkers and everything.

Denise: Yeah so you can put that up in your area or you can advertise in your neighborhood. Just say I’m willing to walk dogs between these times. So great! You found out that, do you have a dog?

Derek: Yeah I have a Yorkie and Poodle. I don’t know if he is a poodle that’s just what we suspect but he’s definitely a Yorkie.

Denise: That’s really cute. Is there anything you’d like to share or tell somebody who was making a decision about coming into treatment?

Derek: Definitely if you see something a little bit off and you’re like maybe I can’t stop.

Denise: Or maybe I need help because normally there’s a lot of underlying issues correct? Did you feel like you had some underlying issues that was pushing your addiction?

Derek: Yeah mine was self-esteem. Back in middle school I was bullied a lot by other people on how I look and everything. I kind of turned into to this person that would like stay away from people or snap at people before they could snap at me. That’s how I felt. Back in middle school I was bullied a lot by other people on how I look and everything. I kind of turned into to this person that would like stay away from people or snap at people before they could snap at me.

Denise: You are actually a very cool person! You are very much of an intellect, a musician you have very good drumming skills which is a gift. You always have something you can fall back on or have around you. Vibrations and drumming is such a healing experience.

Derek: But definitely of you think you might be addicted you don’t have to go treatment but go to a NA meeting and see what it’s about. Definitely if you do come into treatment you definitely do the 12 steps because that’s kind of what opened my eyes to this stuff.

Denise: I love to hear you say that because they are. They have worked for such a long period of time. I work in this field a long time and the alumni’s I’ve talked to when I ask what’s kept you in recovery they have said the 12 steps. You have gotta work the 12 steps. It’s good to hear you say that. So you feel a lot stronger this time coming out of treatment?

Derek: Definitely, it’s not only the probation that’s keeping me clean. It’s like I just don’t wanna do it anymore. I was so exhausted like emotionally and physically that I just couldn’t.

Denise: It takes a lot out of you.

Derek: Jeez man it really does.

Denise: It takes a lot of energy to be high and angry. You’ve seen that in here when you observe people that come in and they are very angry. You see them shift and you’re like wow it’s so much easier to have a smile on your face. You don’t have to be holding up all this anger, punching walls and the shame that goes with it. You start not liking yourself at all. You did a great job and you really done the work. We’re really hoping that you’ll be able to carry this with you outside of the facility and be an example for other teens, especially ones that are struggling with addiction.

Derek: I’m excited to go back.

Denise: Some of them may not be a little jealous cause they haven’t gone their yet but remember that it took work. It takes work and you gotta do the work. Then you reap the rewards and you definitely earned it. You have a really good family and I think you’re gonna be successful.

Derek: Yeah.

Denise: So keep in touch and let us know how you’re doing.

Derek: Recovery is not something that happens to you. You have to be the one to do it.

Denise: At the end of the day we can’t get through life saying yes and no.

Derek: Yeah.

Denise: It’s the gray area that we get really murky. When we’re in that gray area we get kind of like ahh I can do this. It’s either no or yes.

Derek: There is no such thing as a weekend addict.

Denise: Yes that falls in the gray area. They say they only use a little bit but we know that little bit grows more and more. It can change and evolve into other drugs.

Derek: Of course.

Denise: People used to say oh no weed isn’t a gate way drug. Even cigarettes are a gateway drug.

Derek: Of course.

Denise: We’ll keep spreading the word and hopefully reach out to others like yourself. That way they don’t have to go down and make their life really difficult. Hopefully you’ll be an example to others.

Derek: Thank you.

Denise: We want you to come back and share with the group. You’ve become family to us and will miss you when you go. Have a safe trip back home and thank you for sharing!

Derek: Thank you!

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Teen shares why Inspirations was the key to his addiction recovery

June 21, 2016

Inspirations for Youth and Families (IYF) have helped many teens reclaim their life from drug or alcohol addiction as well as mental behavioral issues. Many teens come to us feeling troubled and alone but leave knowing they will always have a home away from home and family at Inspirations like Austin, who just left our treatment center after a long stint in addiction recovery.

Austin's addiction recovery story

Austin described himself as aggressive in nature and prone to fits of rage before coming to Inspirations. However, after a lengthy and productive recovery Austin learned the appropriate coping skills to deal with his feelings of anger.

Austin was refreshingly honest with his troubled past growing up a good part of his childhood without parents.

“In middle school I started doing dope. I dropped out of school and started selling drugs. I started doing meth and then my mom went to prison and DCF came into my life.”

Inspirations was not Austin's first dual diagnosis drug and alcohol addiction treatment center. At previous drug rehab stints, he was prone to run away. This destructive behavior was not an issue at Inspirations as Austin worked the program and never once ran away from the facility.

“I was running away from group homes. Every time I would run and get high they would send me to rehab.”

With such a tough environment to grow  up in Austin eventually dropped out of school and did drugs full time. When he came to Inspirations, our education program allowed him to catch up with his studies. The  educational staff  worked one-on-one with Austin to help him the areas he struggled.

“I thought it was just remarkable how open he was about his academic weakness and how he wanted to improve on his studies.”

-Denise Achee, Education Director

Austin's stay at Inspirations for Youth and Families

Austin has the record for the longest stay this year so far at 147 days. He looks at his time at Inspirations positively.

“It didn't feel long, it felt like I needed it. I think if I left earlier I would have got in trouble again. By staying  for such a long time helped me out and now I’m ready to successfully move forward on my recovery.”

Austin, believe it or not enjoyed his stay at Inspirations.

“It’s nice. They stock your fridge every Thursday so we have food, we got drinks, we have movies, and we got games now. We have a Play station 4, ping pong table and big screen TV. So it was nice.”

While here Austin really opened up and came into his own. He enjoyed attending our sober outings and many other  fun activities.

“I like the cooking classes! We also left the facility often to go on day-trips like paint ball and water parks.We even went to the Everglades and I saw  alligators for the first time in my life. That was nice. We went to so many places.”

We are glad to have been a part of Austin’s recovery and will be wishing him the best while he continues his education. To any parents thinking whether Inspirations is the right place for your teen here are a few words from Austin.

“Don’t take your son out because they say they want to go home. For the kid it’s not bad here at all. It’s the best your ever gonna get at a rehab. Actually, it’s like summer camp! But nicer.”

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Lost in the Might by Julianna

June 20, 2016
As always Inspirations for Youth and Families music therapy sessions encourage our teens to explore their talents and interests. We held our bi-monthly Talent Show giving our teens a platform for them to display their talents. 

We had a wide range of musical acts including  an original song written through our music therapy sessions. Julianna perfected her song with her sessions and was able to create this emotionally detailed song highlighting the struggles of her addiction. She and fellow client Alexis performed the original piece together which really hit a note with our teens going through similar problems.

After witnessing such an awesome show some of our teens were excited for their next music therapy sessions. One of our teens walked away extremely inspired to foster a new talent hoping to help his recovery.

"Now that I see how their practice paid off I want to try and learn the guitar. I think it will be good for my recovery." 

-Phillip
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Escape by Brianna

June 20, 2016
As always Inspirations for Youth and Families music therapy sessions encourage our teens to explore their talents and interests. We held our bi-monthly Talent Show giving our teens a platform for them to display their talents. 

Brianna wows show with her soulful rendition of  a song she wrote called Escape. Our teens were really in awe at her natural talent. Normally she gives off a very shy demeanor. She took this opportunity to step out of her comfort zone and tackle one of her aspirations – to be a musical performer. We are extremely proud of Brianna for taking this step and accomplishing her goal of performing in front of an audience.

After witnessing such an awesome show some of our teens were excited for their next music therapy sessions. One of our teens walked away extremely inspired to foster a new talent hoping to help his recovery.

"Now that I see how their practice paid off I want to try and learn the guitar. I think it will be good for my recovery." 

-Phillip
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Wonderwall cover by Inspirations for Youth and Families

June 20, 2016
As always Inspirations for Youth and Families music therapy sessions encourage our teens to explore their talents and interests. We held our bi-monthly Talent Show giving our teens a platform for them to display their talents. 

The crowd was so moved by the show that they requested an encore. For this performance our peforming teens invited more and more fellow clients to sing along. The staff and clients began singing Wonderwall by Oasis together. Even if they didn’t know all the lyrics.

After witnessing such an awesome show some of our teens were excited for their next music therapy sessions. One of our teens walked away extremely inspired to foster a new talent hoping to help his recovery.

"Now that I see how their practice paid off I want to try and learn the guitar. I think it will be good for my recovery." 

-Phillip
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Teen shares how Inspirations behavioral tech helped her recovery

May 12, 2016

Many families reach out to Inspirations for Youth and Families to help in returning them to the child they have lost to drug or alcohol addiction. Through family sessions our primary therapists work together with teens and their family to rebuild the relationship destroyed by drug abuse.

One often overlooked piece of the recovery puzzle is the impact behavioral technicians have on the recovery of out teens suffering from drug or alcohol abuse as well as mental and behavioral conditions. This was the case for Alexis who made a great connection with our staff especially Inspirations behavioral tech Devonna.

I really connected with Devonna about my higher spirit. She was someone I could go and talk to. She really motivates me. She really loves the girls and her job. I love how she’s very supportive and caring.

- Alexis H.

Inspirations for Youth and Families mission is to not only help teens recover successfully from drug or alcohol addiction but to help them continue to lead a more successful and sober life when they complete the program. 

The staff are doing a good job. You can actually go up to staff and tell them about a situation or how you're feeling about yourself and they’ll just listen. They’re not going to criticize you or put you down. They’re gonna be there. If you need to cry then you’ll have a shoulder to cry on. They’ll lift you back up.

Family therapy is also a great way to get everyone involved in the recovery process. Along with relationship building exercises teens as well as their families are taught how to effectively communicate and how to properly help them remain sober at home. Although Alexis may have came to Inspirations unwillingly, she quickly adapted to the program and was able to see why her parents made the difficult decision to send her to get help.

"It actually took me a week to get adjusted here just talking to the girls, being in the rooms, having groups and stuff like that," said Alexis.

Once adjusted Alexis really took to the program and was able to learn a lot about herself.

"I’ve noticed I don’t want to smoke weed anymore that I actually wanna get my life together and not end up in the wrong path. I learned a lot. I didn’t really get along with girls at home that well, but I’ve actually got close to some of them here," added Alexis.

While here Alexis revealed her family relationship was also able to thrive and looks forward to going home and seeing her family again.

"What I liked the most was having family sessions. I have a better relationship with my dad now. He told me he was proud of me for getting help and that when I come home things are going to be different," Alexis noted.

Listen to Alexis full story of recovery here:

Dania: Thank you for coming and thank you for volunteering. So I just really quick wanted to ask you to tell me about where you’re from?

Alexis: Hi, I’m Alexis and I’m from Arizona. I’m not from Florida. Where I’m from I live on a reservation and there’s no malls, no restaurants it’s just like a plain reservation. There’s gas stations and just stuff where you can buy groceries and stuff like that.

Dania: So it’s just like a small little town?

Alexis: Yeah.

Dania: Okay so what brought you to Inspirations?

Alexis: What brought me to Inspirations was I got court ordered to come here. So it was because I got charged with public intoxication.

Dania: So I guess you’re here for alcohol predominately right?

Alexis: Yeah and weed and skipping school.

Dania: So I just want you to really quick tell about your time in treatment here.

Alexis: My time here was wonderful! Sitting here in rehab I have had a lot of groups and time to think about feelings. We all have made wrong choices that put us where we are, I have made choices that put me here. Being here I realized how badly my addiction was and how it caused me to act towards my parents.

Dania: Okay, overall you think you had a good experience?

Alexis: Yes, yes I did!

Dania: You learned a lot?

Alexis: Yeah I learned a lot. I didn’t really get along with girls that well but I’ve actually got close to some of them here.

Dania: Okay so back home you’re not really close with girls. (laughs) Neither was I growing up.

Alexis: Yeah (laughs).

Dania: What would you consider to be some of the memorable moments you’ve had here? How long have you been here?

Alexis: I’ve been here 46 days. Memorable moments I’ve had was going to the beach, going to the movies, spending time with the girls, having deep conversations with them and just having them around. It was really good because when I leave it’s going to be really hard. I really got close to some of them. I just want them to continue to do better things in their lives instead of doing drugs.

Dania: Okay, so you’re most memorable time was spending time with the girls and just doing normal teenage stuff.

Alexis: Yeah.

Dania: Of all the things you did all the groups, all the different types of therapy what did you like the most?

Alexis: What I liked the most was having family sessions.

Dania: You liked those?

Alexis: Yeah I like those because I only get to talk to my parents like every Sunday and I have to wait a whole week to talk to them again because I’ve never been quite away from home this long. I think this is the longest I’ve been.

Dania: So you like that you still get to talk to your parents and keep up relations with the rest of your family?

Alexis: Yeah!

Dania: This your first time in treatment right?

Alexis: Yes. This is my first being in treatment.

Dania: Did you know you were coming?

Alexis: No it was a surprise.

Dania: It was a surprise. They just said you were going to?

Alexis: They just said we were going to Florida. They didn’t tell me where I was going they just told me I was going to Florida, like a vacation. Then I came here.

Dania: Were you mad about that?

Alexis: I was pretty mad yeah. Like the first two days. After a while I just kind of had to get used to it because I knew I was gonna be here more than 45 days.

Dania: So how long do you think it took you to get used to it?

Alexis: Getting used to being here?

Dania: Yes.

Alexis: It actually took me a week. A week to get adjusted here and talk to the girls, being in the rooms, having groups and stuff like that.

Dania: How was your family relationship before you came here?

Alexis: It was horrible. It was extremely horrible. I didn’t have a good relationship with my dad. My dad would constantly yell at me, tell me I’m not doing anything, or that I’m going to end up somewhere else if I continue what I was doing and all that. We just always went off on one another and he always put me down and everything. But my relationship was good with my mom because I could talk to her about everything with my dad and she’d just be there. I could just talk to her about stuff.

Dania: Okay so now that you’re here what’s it like? Is it better?

Alexis: It actually has gotten better. I actually have a better relationship with my dad now. I’ve noticed quite a few changes but people can’t change in like 3 days but I do notice a change when I do talk to him. He told me he was proud of me for getting help and that when I come home things are going to be different.

Dania: So you’re excited now? To see how things are going to be different.

Alexis: Yeah I’m so excited!

Dania: Within yourself do you see any like major changes you’ve had? Some people only see subtle changes. Do you think you’ve had an overall change or just needed a little help?

Alexis: I think I’ve noticed a change actually because before I got here I basically told myself I was gonna like smoke weed every day and what not. I’ve noticed I don’t want to smoke weed anymore that I actually wanna get my life together and not end up in the wrong path. Not ending up in jail, I’m glad I’m not in jail but I’ve actually noticed quite a change in my attitude too.

Dania: You feel you have a better outlook now?

Alexis: Yeah on my perspective.

Dania: So in like a year or two what are your plans?

Alexis: In a year or two plans would be to finish high school. I’m going to be a senior next year and I want to finish out my senior year strong. I going to go to school every day, get good grades and aim for getting a car like my parents told me. I’m also going to start applying for colleges and exploring different places. I’m going to study for becoming a nurse.

Dania: Oh cool! So do you know how to drive?

Alexis: Yeah, I don’t have a license yet but I think when I get home I’m going to start working on that too.

Dania: So if you had to say anything to anyone that has been exactly in your shoes before you got here what would you say? So say just as you’re about to leave tomorrow you see someone walking in and they had the same problems you did and you had the opportunity to stop and really quickly tell them something what would you say?

Alexis: I would just say not to run away because it’s not worth it and tell them to just take it day by day things will get better; you’ll notice a change in your life. Drugs are not worth it they are always going to be there. I would just tell them just to stay strong, keep their head up, that they can do it and that they can get something out of the program.

Dania: My last question now will be no pressure (laughs). If you had to say something to all the staff or any staff in particular who would you say something to?

Alexis: I would actually tell them they’re doing a good job. You can actually go up to staff and tell them about a situation or how you feeling about yourself and they’ll just listen. They’re not going to criticize you or put you down they’re gonna be there. If you need to cry then you’ll have a shoulder to cry on. They’ll lift you back up and I really connected with Devonna about my higher spirit. She was someone I could go and talk to. She really motivates me. She really loves the girls and her job. I love how she’s very supportive and caring.

Dania: So yay Devonna!

Alexis: (Laughs) Yeah!

Dania: Anything else you want to add?

Alexis: I’m really excited to go home tomorrow! Things are going to be different going forward or at least how it was before I left. I’m excited to see my family, excited to build a better relationship with them and be a better older sister to my younger siblings.

Dania: How many siblings do you have?

Alexis: Three.

Dania: You’re ready to take charge and lead?

Alexis: Yeah.

Dania: That’s good! Well thank you for letting me interview you.

Alexis: Thank you!

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Inspirations teen rehab encourages teen’s talents

May 4, 2016

This past week Inspirations for Youth and Families held a talent show to exhibit the talents of our teens as well as to build their self-esteem. We invited fellow teens as well as Inspirations teen rehab staff members to watch our teens unveil all their hidden talents.

Inspirations teen rehab performances

Two of our teen girls also decided to display their awesome talent performing a duet version of Pretty Hurts by Beyonce. Their team work and unison warmed our hearts as they explained before performing how nervous they both were. Despite their fear these girls rocked this performance and were met by a roar of applause at the end.

Watch some of our performances on our new Inspirations blog!
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Inspirations teen drug rehab helps teen to realize her potential

April 25, 2016

At Inspirations for Youth and Families, a teen drug rehab, one of our many goals besides helping teens to successfully recover from addiction is to foster their dreams and aspirations. Many teens come at a time in their life that is very crucial for their education and future. We believe your teen’s addiction should not put a dent in their future especially when they are working so hard towards a sober life.

Karlee was admitted to Inspirations and immediately we recognized her awesome potential! Since her admittance she has grown immensely and we are so proud of her progress! We have taught Karlee a lot about herself as she prepares to enter college within the year.

“This program taught me that I have to try for everything I want to achieve it doesn’t just get handed to me.” – Karlee L.

Her strides towards her education and overall well being are truly inspiring. Karlee also became a leader among her peers always encouraging and helping the other girls as well as staff. While at Inspirations Karlee’s recovery was not always so smooth but she has since then learned a lot about coping and how to handle troubling situations.

“Recovery is not the easiest path to go on but I should have told myself to not give up. Those times I wanted to give up and just go with whatever some people were doing and try to go back to my old ways.” – Karlee a former Inspirations teen

During her stay at Inspirations Karlee was very apprehensive about her future and how her drug abuse would effect it. Working through our education program she was able to catch up on school work and even found her very own unique coping method that she wants to become her career.

"While I’m here I learned that I’m really good with numbers never thought I’d be good at that. So I’ve learned that by doing statistics in my head when I have cravings and stuff like that it makes me forget I really wanna go find some cocaine. I’m actually preparing for the career I choose and going to a university studying Computer Science."

Hear about Karlee’s amazing recovery at our teen drug rehab here:

Karlee: That started when I was thirteen years old and my brothers introduced me to K-2, made me smoke it with them. Then I switched schools and I went for the crowd that was always kinda smoke pot. I thought that was more of where I was, you know the stoners. So then they were smoking pot so I smoke pot with them then it just lead for me to find different crowds that were doing more drugs because that’s where I thought I was.

Jessica: So you’ve been clean for?

Karlee: Forty nine days.

Jessica: Forty-nine days that good! How do you feel about that looking into the future?

Karlee: I’m really excited and nervous at the same time because you know recovery isn’t easy and I’ve watched my family struggle with it. But I’m extremely positive about how I’m going to do this. I’m excited to get out there and actually live a sober life for once in three years, you know? I wanna experience everything I’ve just been day dreaming. So I’ excited to go out there and be able to remember what I do and have fun and really enjoy it.

Jessica: So what are your plans for all of that? For being able to enjoy this new sober life style.

Karlee: I’m actually preparing more with the career I choose. I’m going to be going to a university soon studying computer science and philosophy. I want to do more trips and maybe go a little into photography.

Jessica: So you’ve definitely gotten into some solid interests and hobbies even that you’re going to be picking up. Do you think they are going to be helping you and supporting your sobriety?

Karlee: Yeah, I learned while I’m here I learned that I’m really good with numbers never thought I’d be good at that. So I’ve learned that doing statistics in my head when I have cravings and stuff like that. Just kind of thinking really splitting the crowd apart. Like ¾ of girls here are seventeen or 67% percent of the girls here their drug of choice is weed. It’s just putting those numbers in my head makes me forget about like “Oh! I really wanna go find some cocaine or oh! I need to do that”, you know? Cause it’s just not what I need you know.

Jessica: So you found that using your new analytical perspective is something that’s gonna be helpful to you as a coping skill?

Karlee: Yeah. I could never keep a thought process long enough to do a math equation and now I can just do it on my own.

Jessica: What are some of the biggest things you’ve learned since you been here? Either about life in general or about you, as learning about yourself or just about the process? What are you taking away?

Karlee: I’ve learned that the life I chose with drugs isn’t who I’m gonna be forever. This was just the beginning. I learned that I’m a hell of a lot better person sober than I am high. I thought that you know I’m so much better high. This program taught me that I have to try for everything I want to achieve it doesn’t just get handed to me. I sure as hell worked my butt off to get where I am today and I’m so proud of myself for it.

Jessica: We’re proud of you too. We’ve seen a lot of hard work come from you. It’s really inspiring to see. What would you, if you could turn around and talk to yourself right before you first got here, what would you say?

Karlee: Well when I first got here I was really scared, it was either be in here for 45 days or god knows how long like 90 days and I’ve never been in a rehab. I thought I had a problem but I didn’t know if I was gonna get judged or what was gonna happen to me. I would have told myself that I should just try a little bit harder because I made a few mistakes while I was here. Recovery is not the easiest path to go on but I should have told myself you know to not give up. Those times you know I wanted to give up and just go with whatever some people were doing and try to go back to my old ways. But, I should have just reminded myself that you gotta get better.

Jessica: You said you were afraid you might be judged what do you mean by that?

Karlee: Well when I was going to school I was the only person outwardly using cocaine. It’s normal for people to smoke pot and you know take pills but for the people who take cocaine and do meth that’s really not okay. Like people really make fun of us so I thought when I go to rehab people would do that but, that’s the opposite place that happens. That’s the opposite thing that happens here. These people are so welcoming and really it’s the exact opposite of judgment.

Jessica: So I know that while you’ve been here going back a bit to the old stuff you’ve done a lot of looking at stats from the different girls that have been here, their ages, as well as each individual’s drug of choice might have been or what drugs they have tried or used at various points in the past. Kind of connecting that thought with this idea that its quote “normal” for somebody to be using marijuana or things like that but on the other end of the spectrum you have things that are harder drugs the meth and of that nature. You see a whole spectrum of people of here so what do you think about that?

Karlee: I really think it’s interesting because for the most part a lot of the girl’s drug of choice here is weed and I think that’s because it has become so acceptable. It’s somewhat legal for medicinal marijuana so a lot of people find it a little bit easier to go to. No one really figures out or think cocaine is really bad when our doing it but when you’ve never done it you just think that wow I would die but everyone knows you’d have you’d have to ingest a lot of cocaine in like ten seconds in order for you to die. It’s also a range of things but the girls here or some of the girls here with heroin and meth it seems like it just weed to them and there’s not as many girls.

Jessica: So when you’re looking at it and going through groups and stuff like that you see that somebody coming in that has this same type of issue. They have a issue with just “marijuana” it’s just pot but it can cause a lot of these really big issues even outside of the overdosing situation. It can cause some really big breakdowns and the ability to have an open area for people with addictions ranging from marijuana to heroin to cocaine to various pills and things of that nature. Coming back again it’s that lack of judgment but everyone is here because they are in at least a similar type of situation.

Karlee: Yeah I mean for the most part we all had a problem growing up and we tried to find something, a different way to go about it. We couldn’t find it in anything else so drugs was the easiest way for us to you know get out. That’s what I did. I did xanex to roofies just to forget whatever happened to me. When I didn’t wanna do xanex I was smoking weed it’s just a long train of weed’s not doing it for me anymore but heroin’s like weed so I’m gonna do that. Or I don’t like the downers so I’m gonna do cocaine so my schooling is better or meth because it’s cheaper than cocaine. It’s just we were rationalizing how we get away from our problems through drugs.

Jessica: So just wrapping up you got some really good plans and some big aspirations going to university, going into statistics and philosophy. Anything else that you wanted to say? I think that you got your 49 days and you got some really good plans.

Karlee: I guess I have to say that this is not forever and also that you may just be smoking pot right now but I was just smoking pot too and then I became so close to getting into meth before I came here. You really got to think about it in the big picture. Do you want help for something or are gonna keep hiding from it with drugs? I mean help for yourself don’t try to help yourself with drugs.

Jessica: Well thank you that was fantastic!

Karlee: Thank You!

See what else Karlee had to say about her Inspirations stay here!

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Marijuana rehab teen testimonial

April 18, 2016

Although Samantha seems like your average everyday teen she suffered from self medication by abusing marijuana.

What sent me here was behavior and the use of weed at the same time. When I was using all I thought about was I don’t want to do this. I procrastinated more.

Since her admittance Sam has learned how to cope with her anger and also how to look at her problems differently.

Being in an apartment with girls it drove me insane but it really helped me keep control. It helped me learn how to keep control because I was able to use my coping skills and contain my anger.

She shares how her stay has made her grown by talking to a therapist and working out her problems daily.

One of the girls said I said something that made her upset and she was blowing up and I was just like look at me and talk to me. If we have a problem we can figure this out. She told me today that she appreciates that because she’s never had someone come up to her and help her figure out the problem then it was always behind the back talking. - Samantha

Even before being admitted Samantha was great in academics and that continued to soar even while in rehab. Her dedication to her education is a testament of how hard she's worked and commitment to being the best version of herself.

I’m in three AP courses and all honors classes. I have worked way too hard to get to where I am now. I’m very grateful and I’m so ready to get into college. 

Sam's stay here prepared her for life back at home and she is more excited than ever to have a better relationship with her parents.

It’s good practice for when you have to go back into the real world. I’m very grateful and I’m just looking forward to having a great relationship with them(her parents). -Samantha

Listen to Samantha's full story of growth here:

Denise: Hello! So today is your day to go home.

Samantha: Yes!

Denise: How does that feel?

Samantha: I’m excited but sad at the same time. It’s a weird emotion.

Denise: Okay tell us about what brought us to Inspirations.

Samantha: Well I had an anger problem and then drugs were a side effect. At least that’s what they told me. I figured what sent me here was behavior and the use of weed at the same time.

Denise: Do you think you self medicated your anger with substance?

Samantha: Definitely I used weed to. All I wanted to do when I was mad was feel happy and weed made me feel nothing. So I thought that was better than anger.

Denise: So did you discover where that anger was coming from?

Samantha: I have an authority problem and I don’t like being told what to do. After being here I kind of worked through that and figured out that its authority and I can’t really do anything about it. So there’s always going to be a person in charge of me.

Denise: So you’ve definitely earned some coping skills when it comes to authority.

Samantha: Yes.

Denise: Did you know you were coming here when you came to Inspirations?

Samantha: I had no idea until I was like three hours away.

Samantha: I live five hours away so I got in the car because I thought we were going on a drive then I was like okay we are really far away.

Denise: This is drive is really taking a long time? (laughs)

Samantha: Where are we going? We’re taking you to a place. Then I was lied to about where I was coming. I didn’t figure it out till I actually got here that it was a rehab center.

Denise: I remember that day. I remember you being very upset and very angry which is understandable.

Samantha: And I didn’t have clothes.

Denise: You didn’t have any clothes so you were very angry. So we managed to get the clothes you needed right?

Samantha: Yeah.

Denise: How long did it take you to kind of settle in and just feel okay?

Samantha: The first week was rough but probably by that first weekend I was feeling better. We got to go to the beach so I felt a lot better because the beach is like home to me, I love it. So probably four or five days until I got situated.

Denise: That’s when you got settled?

Samantha: Yeah, when I got my clothes everything went smoother. (laughs)

Denise: It changed your attitude.

Samantha: Changed my attitude completely when I had more to choose to wear.

Denise: So have you ever been to treatment before? Was this your first time?

Samantha: This was my first time.

Denise: That’s very different huh? It’s kind of scary. It was a lot of emotions you were feeling the first week.

Samantha: It was eye opening too because I didn’t even like know. Some of the like other girls here their drug of choice is so out there that I didn’t even know that this was real that people really did things like this and that this was real life and very eye opening too.

Denise: You’ve heard a lot of stories while you were here.

Samantha: Yes there was not a single girl here that was here besides one when I got here. It’s all new girls.

Denise: So you’ve heard a lot of stories you’ve been to the NA meetings. You’ve realized the dangers of drugs and where it can take you. And you realized the ones you thought would never get caught up in it they did.

Samantha: Yeah.

Denise: So was this the first time you’ve ever had therapy or did you do therapy before?

Samantha: I’ve never even therapy before so all of this was new.

Denise: How did it seem because I’m sure when you’ve never done therapy before how did it feel?

Samantha: I was like what the hell I’m not a crazy person. I don’t need therapy. (laughs) That was literally my train of thought. Like why do I have to do this? Then I realized you can have a therapist and it’s not bad. Having a therapist is good you’re not crazy because you go to a therapist.

Denise: Do you think everybody should have therapists?

Samantha: Most people I think should have therapists. If you don’t have anyone to talk to that’s a person who you can talk to. It’s a rock, it’s always going to be there.

Denise: It’s someone outside of the family and friends.

Samantha: It’s a non biased opinion.

Denise: You’ve had very high academics. You’ve talked to me about when you came in here and how you’ve had a lot of work to do. You are in how many AP courses?

Samantha: I’m in three AP courses and all honors classes.

Denise: We were like oh geez how is she gonna be able to do all this and keep up with that?

Samantha: Two hours of schoolwork is rough.

Denise: But you managed. You think you managed?

Samantha: Yes, I surprisingly got all of my science work done and I’m sure I’m gonna need a little help for tests and stuff. But, I got almost all my work done and what I don’t I plan to finish on Sunday before I leave.

Denise: It’s amazing what you can do when you’re not using substance right?

Samantha: I got through so much work!

Denise: In an hour you can get through so much work.

Samantha: I finished a whole chapter in like a day.

Denise: Using is very distracting to our brains right?

Samantha: Yup.

Denise: We can’t have the focus that you can when clean. Did you notice that?

Samantha: Yeah a lot. When I was using all I thought about was I don’t want to do this. I procrastinated more. I would use and think oh I have all week so let me smoke some now and then do it tomorrow but, then I would smoke the next day and it was a chain of events.
Denise: It kept getting in your way?

Samantha: Yeah. I never got it done.

Denise: I know you were very angry of course when your parents dropped you off. How has that progressed?

Samantha: I actually miss my parents now. When they dropped me off I wanted nothing to do with them and now I can’t wait to see them!

Denise: Aw! I can’t wait to see them! I can’t wait to see them see you. That’s what I look forward to seeing. It’s so beautiful when you see parents with such a difficult choice to make putting your child in treatment. It’s not easy and most people would prefer to keep the problem in the closet right?

Samantha: Yeah that’s kind of how it was I had two separate lives. I had school and church and then drugs. And my home life and it was going downhill fast because of the drugs but my school it was shifting a little but not dramatically. But it was so different and its going to be weird going back.

Denise: So you understand the courage of your parents and how difficult it was to bring you here?

Samantha: Yeah, I was always travelling. So I was wondering how this was any different than being in Europe for a month and a half and they were like because in Europe we get to talk to you every day.

Denise: You’ve really reignited your love for your parents? And now you’re starting a new chapter.

Samantha: I cannot just wait to go home and be with my family.

Denise: Have you done a home contract?

Samantha: Yes.

Denise: Talk to us a little about your contract.

Samantha: Some of it I’ve said I have a problem with authority and I’m working through that part of it.

Denise: We are a work in progress our whole lives.

Samantha: Yeah that’s true, some of the things did make me upset but I know how to work through them but a lot of the home contract I filled it out first before my parents even saw it and then we sent it to them with mine already filled out. They only asked to change like two things. They wanted me to add one more person on the no contact list and I agreed with it. I wasn’t expecting this but they told me if I did well I’d be allowed to see her again, I would be allowed to hang out with her it just depends on me. This was the biggest thing they told me they didn’t want me to go to concerts and I’m obsessed with going to concerts.

So we compromised type of thing. I had to agree not to un-chaperoned for the first three months. There’s this big concert in July and they said they’d re-evaluate how I am then and see if I could go. I was really impressed. My curfew isn’t until almost 11:30 on the weekend. I’m coming out of rehab and that’s good. I was just impressed, I put these crazy things on there to see if they’d let me get away with it and they did I was so happy. Then I was like wait can I change this? And she said no she thought it was good.

Denise: That is very commendable because you are owning your plan. It was created by you; they put in the things they thought were important to them. They’ve also allowed you to if you do well things can change. So that was awesome!

Samantha: That was a big thing for me. I didn’t want it to be set in stone.

Denise: They wanna earn trust back.

Samantha: Yeah and I know that’s going to take time.

Denise: It takes years to earn trust sometimes and one minute to screw it up. So that’s what we have to practice so we don’t screw things up.

Samantha: Yeah, literally ten seconds and it’s all gone.

Denise: It’s like school. Look at all the work you’ve done and take something and destroy it.

Samantha: That’s why I was like I have to do my work here I can’t get a month and a half behind. I have worked way too hard to get to where I am now.

Denise: You know what concerts now have sober tents.

Samantha: Yeah, I’ve never gone to a concert high or anything but they are just worried because the music I listen to is very alternative and stoner like is the term that they use.

Denise: And you’ve learned that not being high you can still love that music; you can still dance to the music.

Samantha: Yeah I still love the music with a passion.

Denise: You’ll probably appreciate it more right?

Samantha: Yeah and I know I can have fun without drugs. My friends we’re hilarious with or without using so gonna have fun without using.

Denise: How was it adapting to living in an environment with other girls and dealing with the dynamic? Sometimes I think the dynamic actually helps us grow. Maybe we have a difficult person that comes and it brings up things we need to look at in ourselves. It goes into group and becomes a discussion and sometimes we are learning a lot from other people and their stories.

Samantha: I know being in an apartment with girls it drove me insane but it really helped me keep control. It helped me learn how to keep control because I was able to use my coping skills and contain my anger. I’m sharing a room with a bunch of girls and we don’t always get agree especially us for some reason we love to clash heads but it was really good for me to be able to breathe and separate myself. I had to figure out I can handle this without exploding.

Last night was my last night and one of the girls said I said something that made her upset and she was blowing up and I was just like look at me and talk to me. If we have a problem we can figure this out. She told me today that she appreciates that because she’s never had someone come up to her and help her figure out the problem then it was always behind the back talking. I’ve definitely learned how to deal with drama and anger issues by living with girls.

Denise: You applied coping skills which is excellent!

Samantha: It’s good practice for when you have to go back into the real world.

Denise: It’s a different thing in the real world and now you’ve got these skills. You have a great future ahead of you, a family that has supported you and they had to do a difficult thing which was put you in treatment. It’s very difficult thing to do, you get that right?

Samantha: Yeah.

Denise: I hope you never have to take your children and put them in treatment but now you respect them and know they did it out of love.

Samantha: Yeah.

Denise: They want you to grow into a successful person.

Samantha: I’m very grateful and I’m so ready to get into college and have a great relationship with my parents. And whenever I find the right guy I want my relationship to be so strong that my dad can walk me down the aisle. I’m just looking forward to having a great relationship with them.

Denise: Okay you’re making me emotional; it’s so beautiful to see you speak like that and too see your face it’s shining. So keep on shining, we love you, you were an awesome part of our program and you did a phenomenal job even with other girls. You really were a leader and that’s important. Thank you so much and have a safe trip and keep in touch because we’d love to hear how you’re doing after you leave. You become our family and you go out the door and we really miss you. We’d love to hear back on how you’re doing.

Samantha: I’ll send you pictures from my mission trips.

Denise: Yay! I love the mission trips and I always ask for graduation pictures.
Samantha: Ah! I can’t wait to graduate!

Denise: I want your graduation pictures and I want to hear how you do on those AP exams. Those are very difficult and I’m curious to see how you do.

Samantha: Yeah, one month left.

Denise: You have to work hard this month but you can do it because you’re clear minded.

Samantha: I’m prepared. I can do this!

Denise: Awesome! Well thank you so much for sharing it’s very important that other people hear what the experience is like to be in treatment. Thank You! Have a good trip!

Samantha: Ah! I’m so excited!

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